Concerts + Workshops

Bridge Arts has developed a plethora of concerts and workshops that cater to grades K-12 to promote learning and creativity.

Select a level of education to get a peak at their concerts and workshops.

  • Grades (K-2)

    Bridge Arts Ensemble’s Elementary school concerts are divided into two sections; grades K-2 and 3-5. The K-2 concerts generally explore different forms of music, including rounds, call-and-response, theme and variations and popular music. They also introduce students to the elements that make up a song. Students in grades 3-5 are exposed to a series of moral lessons. Investigating sharing, equality and humanity, these performances aim to open the eyes of young children to the pleasures of civility and what that means in a diverse, modern world.

  • Grades (3-5)

    Bridge Arts Ensemble’s Elementary school concerts are divided into two sections; grades K-2 and 3-5. The K-2 concerts generally explore different forms of music, including rounds, call-and-response, theme and variations and popular music. They also introduce students to the elements that make up a song. Students in grades 3-5 are exposed to a series of moral lessons. Investigating sharing, equality and humanity, these performances aim to open the eyes of young children to the pleasures of civility and what that means in a diverse, modern world.

  • Grades (6-12)

    Everyone faces their own unique life journey. For some, education is not a given right, for others it is taken for granted. As we develop as teenagers it is important to understand that our experience is not the only experience and that a broad understanding of the world around us leads to empathy which in turn leads to compassion. In Bridge Arts Ensemble’s middle and high school concerts artists share personal experiences that changed the way they think and perceive the world around them.

Grades (K-2)

Grades
(K-2)

Bridge Arts Ensemble’s Elementary school concerts are divided into two sections; grades K-2 and 3-5. The K-2 concerts generally explore different forms of music, including rounds, call-and-response, theme and variations and popular music. They also introduce students to the elements that make up a song. Students in grades 3-5 are exposed to a series of moral lessons. Investigating sharing, equality and humanity, these performances aim to open the eyes of young children to the pleasures of civility and what that means in a diverse, modern world.

Grades (3-5)

Grades
(3-5)

Bridge Arts Ensemble’s Elementary school concerts are divided into two sections; grades K-2 and 3-5. The K-2 concerts generally explore different forms of music, including rounds, call-and-response, theme and variations and popular music. They also introduce students to the elements that make up a song. Students in grades 3-5 are exposed to a series of moral lessons. Investigating sharing, equality and humanity, these performances aim to open the eyes of young children to the pleasures of civility and what that means in a diverse, modern world.

Grades (6-12)

Grades
(6-12)

Everyone faces their own unique life journey. For some, education is not a given right, for others it is taken for granted. As we develop as teenagers it is important to understand that our experience is not the only experience and that a broad understanding of the world around us leads to empathy which in turn leads to compassion. In Bridge Arts Ensemble’s middle and high school concerts artists share personal experiences that changed the way they think and perceive the world around them.

The Story of Babar Program

Old MacDonald Had a Band Program

Song Rainbow

STEM-nesia

A Hero’s Journey

Music of the 60s Program

Wonder Women

Concerts
  • The Story of Babar Program

    Students in grades 3-5 will experience an interactive performance featuring Francis Poulenc's brilliant work, L'Histoire de Babar, le petit elephant as the centerpiece. This program draws from Poulenc’s work, along with additional thematic music specially arranged, orchestrated and narrated by the members of Bridge Arts Ensemble. This 1940 narrative work will introduce musical storytelling and program music to a young audience who will then have the opportunity participate in an interactive, hands on musical game based on the piece, further solidifying the association between music and storytelling.

  • Old MacDonald Had a Band Program

    This highly interactive program introduces young students to the musical concepts of dynamics, tempo, lyrics, range, articulation and melody through the popular American folk song, Old MacDonald, along with special solo performances from our artists. Students will participate in deconstructing each element of music and explore how they work, how performers utilize them and how they can affect a piece of music. By singing, moving, analyzing and listening, young students will learn these concepts and understand how to apply them to all the music in their lives.

  • Song Rainbow

    There are many types of songs and pieces of music, and the way they are structured makes all the difference in how we play, listen, and feel them. The categories of songs are like colors on a rainbow, and together we can see the whole spectrum of music (all of it!). This program explores different forms of music, from rounds, call-and-response, theme and variations and popular music. In this highly interactive program, students from K-2 learn how some of their favorite music is put together.

  • STEM-nesia

    When a band is cursed with a sudden bout of STEM-nesia, they lose the ability to make music. Thankfully, a doctor in their midst is able to diagnose their condition quickly and sets down a path to cure this unique disorder with the help of audience members. In this program, students in grades 3-5 help to cure the STEM-nesia plaguing Bridge Arts Ensemble musicians. Working through the elements of STEM that help guide and direct the elements of music, students learn and interact with the universal principles of STEM to allow the band to make it through their performance.

  • A Hero’s Journey

    What qualities do heroes have? How do heroes get made? Are there heroes in your life? Exploring Joseph Campbell and Christopher Vogler’s literary structure of The Hero’s Journey, this program will take students on a journey through the stages that create, and the characteristics that make a hero. Students in grades 3 – 5 will reflect on the virtues of their heroes, and ultimately learn that a hero dwells within all of us. 1. The Ordinary World 2. The Call to Adventure 3. Test, Allies and Enemies 4. The Ordeal 5. Return with the Elixir

  • Music of the 60s Program

    The 1960s were a particularly fruitful time for art – the zenith of the Avant-garde, rock and pop music, the Beatles, jazz, musical theater. The 1960s were also a time of great innovation in science, technology, communication, as well as a period synonymous with political and social change. What about the 1860s, 1760s and even 1660s? The sixth decade of each century in the modern world seems to be a particularly vibrant time that often pushes toward the next century. What does the music of these times sound like? What historical events were taking place? How have advancements in technology changed the way musical artists communicate with their audiences across these centuries and what occupies the artistic content of each period? This concert explores the music of the sixth decade of each century through the lens of communication and technology.

  • Wonder Women

    We all know Bach, Beethoven, Jay-Z and Kendrick Lamar. Let’s hear it for Boulanger, Beach, Price, Fitzgerald, Beyonce and Taytay! Hear the incredible music of women composers and performers and the stories of strong women throughout history. A program introducing the work of female composers and performers and full of female empowerment!

What to Listen for in Music By Brian Shank

What’s Music All About? by Shaleah Adkisson

Special Me! By Steven Herring

Rhythm and Math by Paul Jones

Introduction to Classical Music

All The World's Rhythm by Joe Tucker

Bucket Drumming by Justin Hines

Feet Got the Beat by Keve Wilson

Workshops
  • What to Listen for in Music By Brian Shank

    When faced with the task of sitting through a concert, or when confronted with new sounds, it is often not enough to count on the inherent aesthetic pleasure of a piece; what is needed to fully enjoy music, as a listener at any level, is a basic understanding of the musical language, in the same way a knowledge of grammar is needed to enjoy literature or poetry, and an eye capable of discerning colors is needed to enjoy a painting. Too often, non-musicians are faced with music that they feel strongly about, but are unable to articulate why they feel so. This workshop is designed to combat that by isolating and explaining essential tools of the composer: rhythm, melody, and tone.

  • What’s Music All About? by Shaleah Adkisson

    This workshop delves into several basic elements of music, starting with the question, “What IS music?”. We unpack melody & rhythm, where music can come from (vocal, instrumental) and how music can directly affect emotion. This workshop employs movement, listening, writing/drawing and discussion (more with older grades) to unpack what makes music fun/sad/scary/silly and what makes us love it so much!

  • Special Me! By Steven Herring

    This workshop helps to cultivate students’ musical identity. The workshop begins with a fun call and response. Through interactive activities, students learn how to use music to express feelings and emotions.They learn the many ways the Bridge Arts Ensemble musicians express themselves through their instruments. The workshop concludes with students listening to a musical performance and sharing their reactions in a drawing.

  • Rhythm and Math by Paul Jones

    In this workshop, students will learn the connection between rhythm and math by using their own bodies as instruments. They will learn to apply what they have learned rhythmically and mathematically to create their own compositions.

  • Introduction to Classical Music

    They will explore the music of 4 different countries while learning to tap into their emotions and feelings. Students will work through all the major time periods of classical music: Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Modern via brief descriptions of what life was like during those times and profile one or two famous composers from each era.

  • All The World's Rhythm by Joe Tucker

    This workshop explores the music of Senegal, Bali, New Orleans and Lebanon. Through interactive exercises, including bucket drumming, students will learn how they all tie together.

  • Bucket Drumming by Justin Hines

    Students will understand the relationship of rhythm, mathematically and sonically, by counting out loud and playing the rhythmic phrase (a combination of different rhythms) at the same time. They will develop a very good relationship with pulse and rhythm.

  • Feet Got the Beat by Keve Wilson

    This workshop strives to grow awareness of music and dance from other countries and cultures and experience class community and enrichment. How can we better understand communities and groups of people different from ourselves? How can music and dance educate us on lands far away from the United States?